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Contacts
Examination Office
Judith König
pa@informatik.uni-bonn.de
Tel.: 0228 / 73 - 4418
Fax: 0228 / 73 - 4788
Office hours:
Mon. 1 pm - 3 pm
Wed. and Thu. 10 am - 12 am
Bachelor and Master Office
Dr. Stefan Lüttringhaus-Kappel
servicebuero@informatik.uni-bonn.de
Tel: 0228 / 73 - 4536 
Fax: 0228 / 73 - 4788
Office hours:
Mon. and Thu. 11 am - 12 am 
Technical questions on Basis
Dr. Stefan Lüttringhaus-Kappel
pos@informatik.uni-bonn.de
Tel.: 0228 / 73 - 4536
Office hours:
Mon. and Thu. 11 am - 12 am

Please find further details on our contact page.

Computer Science Colloquium

Upcoming colloquium talks

 
You are here: Home For Students Master of Science in Computer Science What is Computer Science?

What is Computer Science?

Computer science is an essential part of our daily lives, even though we are often not aware of it. Behind a simple search on Google, complex procedures are hidden and efficient route planning with a navigation device is still a difficult task. Modern cars run only when the built-in software programs function properly and even the life functions of critically ill patients in intensive care units of our hospitals are controlled by computers. At our institute, a multitude of people is busy trying to improve the current technologies and to also develop new and better methods and applications. The basis of all computer science technologies are algorithms. An algorithm is a mathematical representation of a real problem. The ability of a robot to safely move from A to B in an unknown environment is transmitted by an algorithm. The complexity of the board game mill can be accurately represented by an algorithm.

Our professors and academic staff in the departments of theoretical computer science are dealing with such issues every day. In our departments associated to practical computer science these algorithms are tested for their applicability and optimized for specific deployments. The research group ‘Multimedia, Simulation, Virtual Reality’ is currently working on a system that allows them to monitor sleep and determine whether it is restful or not. The department of ‘Enterprise Information Systems’ is racking its brains as to how to teach a computer to identify in a text the number 1950 as the year of birth of a person and not as the number of garden gnomes in a village. Our department ‘Autonomous Intelligent Systems’ develops robots that are able to independently mix a cocktail.

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